Category Archives: Behind the Scenes

Stormy Stories, Volume 2

Welcome to our next Stormy Stories post. In this series we’ll celebrate the unique, rugged, down-to-earth and genuine people we’re proud to call our customers.

We found Randee the very first year we put out a call on Facebook for models, and she returned to work with us again this year. Randee reminds us a lot of the people here in Ironwood: a small-town, northern Minnesota girl who savors life and all the adventures it brings. She owns her own photography business, Made For You Photography, and when she’s not working she’s usually out shooting trap, hunting, snowmobiling or fishing with her family. Did we mention she also works part-time at a store that sells Kromer products?

randee1Here’s some more about Randee from a recent conversation we had about her connection to Stormy Kromer:

SK: How did you come to know about Stormy Kromer?

RD: As a proud fourth generation Kromer wearer, I’ve known about the caps my whole life. When I finally managed to get a cap of my own, it was the Ida Kromer Cap in Pink. I love that hat. And even though I’ve added on to my collection since then, I still wear it often.

SK: Well, since you brought it up, what’s in your Stormy Kromer collection today?

RD: Counting my most recent purchase just a week or so ago, I’ve got six caps, two pair of mittens, a coat and the new Parkland Vest. But my favorite item is the white and raspberry Petal Pusher. It gives me such easy, warm, adorable style. And while I’ve got a few friends who still think “Elmer Fudd” when I mention Kromer, I think I prove them wrong with this cap.

randee3SK: You’re definitely an outdoorsy kind of gal. What’s your most memorable outside moment?

RD: While I’ve had a lot of fabulous experiences, one of the most memorable would have to be when I shot my first deer. I’ll never forget it – I was four months pregnant with my son at the time! My husband was with me, and almost cried he was so excited for me. And of course, my Stormy Kromer was with me too.

SK: You’ve been on two different photo shoots with us now. Is there a moment during a shoot that stands out?

RD: Things got just a little crazy at the shoot this past March. The photographer, the amazing Mitch Kezar, got the idea to shoot a bunch of us from overhead while we were playing cards. To do this, he had to climb up a gazebo and then lay down on top of it, shooting down at us. He had it in his head he could get a great shot and he made it happen!

randeegroupSK: What’s your favorite Stormy Kromer story?

RD: It’s not so much a story but I love the bond you form with other Kromer wearers. When you see someone wearing a cap, you know you can walk right up to them, start a conversation, and most likely, make a new friend. This has happened to me time and time again.

SK: Our new tagline is Made Like You. What does that mean to you?

RD: It means that you are doing it right. Making things that are real, with high standards of quality and service, all the while giving American citizens jobs. Sadly, you don’t see all of those things in one place much anymore.


Employee Profiles: Barb Wilman

I’ve made over half a million hats; I’m still here and counting.
Barb Wilman, Sewing Machine Operator

BarbCUMy job at Stormy Kromer just sort of fell in my lap. I’ve been here for over 20 years now and I’m proud of the work I do. We’re all proud to be here and happy to do what we do. For me, that’s 300-400 hats a day for the last five years on the Kromer line—I’m thankful for the God-given talent of being able to sew anything on any line. So when help is needed, I’m there!

The hat, vest or bag you’re holding right now was made right here. Made in America. That makes me proud, too. Honestly, it reminds me of childhood, when my mom sewed some of our clothes. You knew it was made with love and that it was going to last. That’s what you’re getting here, and when we say “Made like you,” we’re talking about being sturdy and long-lasting.

We are a tough breed here in Michigan’s U.P., and we’re proud to be caretakers of the Kromer legend.

Stormy Stories, Vol. 1

Welcome to the first installment in a new blog series:  Stormy Stories. In this series we’ll celebrate the unique, rugged, down-to-earth and genuine people we’re proud to call our customers.

Today it’s our pleasure to introduce Keith Collick. A native of Negaunee in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Keith may look the slightest bit familiar to you. Why? Because we’re proud to call him a Stormy Kromer model. You see, when we’re getting ready for a photo shoot, we start searching for real-life, honest-to-goodness people we can photograph. Two years ago, we found Keith through Facebook.


Keith, who now lives just outside Minneapolis with his two kids, has modeled for us three times. He’s the Stormy type through and through — with interests ranging from cross country skiing and ice hockey to playing the guitar and banjo. Recently we sat down with him to ask a few questions about his connection to Stormy Kromer:

SK: What was your first introduction to Stormy Kromer?

KC: A few winters ago I bought an Original Stormy, and never looked back. I found Stormy Kromer after doing some internet searches about the U.P. I knew I wanted one as soon as I saw them. They just reminded me of everything back home and of growing up. I remember all the “old timers” wearing them (my great grandfather included) and knew I needed that piece of my history on my head.

SK: What made you respond to our request for models?
KC: I did it mostly because it was a chance to do something new. I normally make faces at cameras when they’re pointed in my direction. I was also excited by the prospect of doing something with a U.P. company like Stormy that’s been around for so long.


SK: You’ve done three photo shoots for us now. What’s your most memorable moment?
KC: I guess I’d have to say the first photo shoot was the most memorable. Everything about it, from meeting the SK staff and other models to actually posing it front of a camera, on purpose.

SK: How many Stormy Kromer items do you own?
KC: I currently have two bags, one shirt, and three hats from Stormy.

SK: So, what’s your favorite?
KC: It’s probably a toss up between my Original Cap and my Sidekick Bag. My cap is on my head pretty much all day, every day during the winter and my Sidekick goes with me on a lot of walks through the woods with the kids.


SK: How do you bring a little bit of the U.P. to Minneapolis?
KC: A few ways. Besides running around constantly in my Stormy Kromer gear, I also make pasties and cudighi pretty regularly. And have the occasional bit of Trenary Toast sent over.

SK: We recently launched a new tagline, “Made Like You.” What does that mean to you?
KC: To me it means, ready for life and what it throws at you.

Plaid Crazy

Stormy Kromer and plaid just seem to go together. Like peas and carrots. Chocolate and peanut butter. Ida and George.

And it happens to be the time of year when we ask you to help us name new plaids we’re working on for 2015. But before we get to that, we thought we’d revisit a few fabrics you helped us name a year ago.

frostThanks to Bill A. for suggesting “Frost” for our first design. This unisex plaid can be found in a host of new products, including The Original and Ida Caps with Hardware, and The Chore Coat.


“Aurora” was a name suggested by two blog readers – Jamie A. and Mandi. Thanks to you both for this picture perfect suggestion! Aurora is shown here in The Ida Outfitter Vest, The Flat Top Cap and The Button Up Cap.


And now, what you’ve truly been waiting for – a plaid without a name! This will be a part of our Fall 2015 collection, and hopefully, will carry a label that one of you suggests. We can’t wait to hear your ideas below.

Naming Plaids for Fall 2014

Well, Stormy Kromer fans, it’s time for another edition of naming plaids.  These posts always garner so many great responses and we love hearing your creative ideas.

So without further ado, let’s get right down to business.  As usual, we’re just showing the plaids but not revealing which products they will be used in.

You can see that these two are the same basic pattern, just in different colorways.  One with a light charcoal base, one with olive.

This one stands on its own.  Green background with pinks, purples and teals.

Well, what do you think?  Let the creativity begin!!

College Colors Day

Did you know today, August 30th, is College Colors Day?

We didn’t, until a few days ago when one of our employees stumbled on their website.  We decided to have a little fun with it, so some of our employees got together wearing Benchwarmer Caps in their college colors.

Are you sporting your college colors today?  Is there a Benchwarmer Cap for your school?

2013 Cornhole Champions!

Some of our loyal blog readers might remember our post from last year about our Annual Cornhole Tournament.

This year’s tournament wrapped up this week and we are proud to introduce you to our champions, The Untouchables! (Better known as Kirk and Shane, in the center of the photo.)

Last year’s winners, Ruff and Ready (or Dennis and Carol) handed over the prestigious corn trophies.  We almost had our first ever repeat champion, as Ruff and Ready played in the championship match.  The Untouchables were just too much to handle.

This year we had about 23 teams participate in the tournament, playing matches on their breaks in a double-elimination format.

We’re already looking forward to next year’s tourney.  We’d also like to add a winter tournament for our employees.  Any suggestions?

Stormy Kromer Signs On To Support U.S. Men’s and Women’s Ski Jumping Teams

IRONWOOD, MI (May 21, 2013) -  Stormy Kromer is pleased to announce that they have been named the Official Lifestyle Apparel Sponsor of USA Ski Jumping and the Official Fashion Wear Supplier of Women’s Ski Jumping USA.

Stormy Kromer is a division of Jacquart Fabric Products, located in Ironwood, Michigan, in the Upper Peninsula, the heart of ski jumping country and home of Copper Peak, the country’s first ski flying jump.

Like the fate-filled cup of coffee and conversation that lead Stormy Kromer CEO, Bob Jacquart, to take the leap of faith and purchase (and ultimately save) the Stormy Kromer Cap Co., Jacquart took a call from friend and business colleague, Greg Windsperger, and their conversation lead to Stormy Kromer’s new sponsorship.  Over the past few decades Jacquart Fabric Products and the company Windsperger worked for, Federal Foam/Airtex Inc, had come to do business, which also brought Windsperger back to his old stomping grounds as he has been actively involved in the sport of ski jumping.  Greg jumped at Copper Peak from 1971-1976, he also competed in the 1974 World Championships, the 1976 Winter Olympics, and went on to coach the U.S. Men’s Ski Jumping Team in the ’84 and ’88 Olympic Games.  So, when there was talk amongst USA Ski Jumping delegates about investigating the opportunity of a possible future meet at Copper Peak, Greg immediately made a call to Bob to ensure a stop at Stormy Kromer was part of the Ironwood itinerary.

Upon meeting the USA Ski Jumping representatives, Bob knew immediately there was an intrinsic connection and that the stories of the Stormy Kromer caps so many have come to wear and love, particularly in winter, and the area’s ski jumping heritage belonged together. And this was before he really knew the story of the U.S. women ski jumpers, who for the first time in history will compete in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Which is hard to believe, because many have seen women competing in ski jumping for decades, especially in Upper Michigan, however even with a decree by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1991, committing that all future Olympic sports must be open to both genders, the ruling excluded the 16 original sports of the Olympic Winter Games, of which, ski jumping was one.  For more than a decade female ski jumpers have been fighting for the right to compete at the Olympics.

This tenacity, coupled with the sheer gumption that any person demonstrates when deciding to try the sport of ski jumping, made the Stormy Kromer sponsorship a perfect fit, much like the company’s iconic cap.

“Stormy Kromer is very excited to support the U.S. Men’s and Women’s Ski Jumping Teams,” said Bob Jacquart, CEO of Jacquart Fabric Products, makers of Stormy Kromer.  “We are a proud American-made company set in a location with a rich ski jumping history and have been making a product that has already unofficially been a part of the sport for decades.”

USA Ski Jumping’s Rex Bell was delighted to welcome Stormy Kromer to the USASJ Family. “Like all our sponsors, Stormy Kromer will play a vital role in the continued development of ski jumping in the United States. Their Stormy Kromer cap shares an historic status, used by hard-working outdoor fans for more than 100 years, which is a perfect fit for the sport of ski jumping.”

As the Official Lifestyle Sponsor, Stormy Kromer will supply members of the Men’s USA National Jumping squad with a variety of products, including their Original Stormy Kromer cap, the Night-Timer Duffle Bag and the Town Coat.

“We too are thrilled to align with Stormy Kromer and its unique and rich history in the outdoor world,” said Robbie Beck, Executive Director of Women’s Ski Jumping USA. “Our athletes are proud to wear these beautiful products and represent Stormy Kromer and the United States as they make their long-anticipated and celebratory debut in the 2014 Olympic Winter Games.”

The company will be providing the members of the U.S. Women’s Ski Jumping Team with items from the Ida Kromer line including the Petal Pusher cap,  the Ida Cap with Hardware, and Ida’s Walking Coat. In addition to the gear being provided to the Women’s Team, $1 from every purchase of each of the Ida Kromer items listed above will go to Women’s Ski Jumping USA, allowing anyone who wants the opportunity to be a part of their historic Olympic debut, an opportunity to support some strong women while sporting some great gear.

“Women have been ski jumping for decades, something we have seen firsthand in our own back yard,” said Gina Thorsen, Vice President of Marketing for Stormy Kromer. “To see them break new ground and prepare to compete in the 2014 Olympics is thrilling. We feel a close connection to the Team’s spirit and tenacity, similar to the spirit of Ida Kromer that has helped take our company to new heights, after all, if it wasn’t for Ida, Stormy wouldn’t have gotten his cap.”

Even with the rich history and relationship between ski jumping and Stormy Kromer, the company is in need of help hunting down historic photos of ski jumpers wearing Stormy Kromer caps. Fans willing to share any old photos will be given a free Stormy Kromer cap in exchange for their effort. The free cap is dependent upon verification that the cap in the image is an official Stormy Kromer and there is a limit of one free cap per household. To send a photo, please mail to Stormy Kromer, Attn: Ski Jump Photos, 1238 Wall Street, Ironwood, MI 49938 (please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope if image is to be returned) or email for more information.

The legend of Stormy Kromer began with a unique cap created in 1903 and was originally stitched by Ida Kromer, Stormy’s wife.  In 2001, Jacquart Fabric Products proudly became the Caretaker of the Legend, not only continuing to produce the iconic cap, but expanding the brand and product line to feature a wide variety of men’s and women’s clothing, outerwear and accessories to complement the popular caps.  Today, the company continues to strive to provide classic yet contemporary products sewn with passion and practicality and still proudly made in the USA for more than a century.


Handmade by Him: Jim Berton, the man behind the pictures.

Up next in our series of employee features is Jim Berton – our resident photography/graphics/technology expert who loves learning new skills and putting them to use at Stormy Kromer.

SK: What do you do at Stormy Kromer?
JB: I wear a lot of hats. Really.

SK: Nice pun.
JB: Thank you. Truly, I learned to do what needs to be done. They needed a product photographer, so I’m the product photographer. I also digitize the embroidery for the logos on the custom hats and other products. I went to school for digitizing, so I’m trained in that, and I’ve got a pretty good background in graphics. I guess I’d say my day is split between embroidery, graphics and photography.

SK: How did you get the job?
JB: I was a plant manager for Modern Case Company in Bessemer, making cases for musical instruments. We had one of the first computerized cutting machines in the area, and when Bob (Jacquart, owner of Stormy Kromer) toured the plant to check out that machine, that’s when we met. When he bought his new cutting machine, he hired me to run it. He hired my wife, too.

SK: Your wife works here?
JB: She does, and we started on the same day. May 5th, eleven years ago.

SK: What have you learned in all that time?
JB: I learn something every day. I have to, or I can’t go to bed at night. Really, I’ll stay up until I learn something new. And I never tell anyone I don’t know how to do something—if they give me one day, I’ll know how to do it tomorrow.

SK: What do you think of the new lines of apparel?
JB: Things here just keep getting better and better and better. And the new gear is just a knockout. I shoot the pictures, and I say to myself, “Man, is this really made here?” I can’t wait to see what they come out with next.

SK: So you like it?
JB: We went from the “old man hat” to the “everyman hat,” and the things we’ve done since Gina (Thorsen, VP of Marketing & Sales) started, well, the sky’s the limit. As a matter of fact, my wife and I always planned to move back to Ohio someday, but because of the positive direction this company is going in, we’re going to stay up here ‘til we die.

SK: How many pieces of Kromer gear do you own?
JB: None, sorry. I’m the weird guy who wears shorts 12 months a year—even when snowblowing—so this warm clothing is just too much for me. I buy it all the time for family and friends, though.

SK: What does “Made in America” mean to you?
JB: It says it all. When I see people working here and putting out a product they’re proud to make, it just says it all.

SK: Anything else you want to say to Kromer fans?
JB: There are only two kinds of people in the world: The ones who get to work here and the ones who wished they work here!